Rants and Raves of a Busy Man

Student. Gamer. Man.

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D&D Next

Forty years ago, two war gamers in Wisconsin collaborated to transpose their favorite hobby into a smaller scale, fantasy game. In 1974, Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson released the very first printing of Dungeons & Dragons. My personal adventure begins about twenty years later, and now, for the fortieth birthday of the original Role Playing Game, the fifth major (eleventh overall) edition has been released.

I was too young to remember when Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (AD&D, still published by the original company, TSR.) became Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition (3e). It is not that I was too young to actually recall, it is that I just did not care about the business world and news that announced that a trading card company in Seattle had bought out my hobby and turned the game I loved into something new. I do remember being in high school and being distraught that Wizards of the Coast quietly released a swath of edits and adjustments to the core rules. More wild would be that only a few short years later, the 3.5 Edition would be replaced by Fourth Edition (4e). 4e would become referred to as “The Pen & Paper MMO” for the similarities between it and the rise of popularity of massively multiplayer online games, such as World of Warcraft. In 2012, Wizards made the biggest and most awaited announcement in seven years. A new edition was in the works.

D&D Next was announced to be basically a “Best Of” game system. Through two years of play testing, the development team listened closely to what the people who love playing Dungeons & Dragons want in their game. David M. Ewalt noted in his book Of Dice and Men, that when he attended GenCon, during a panel discussing this new edition, he observed Mike Mearls (One of the lead designers of D&D Next) sitting alone, reading page after page of comments about the new edition. If this is the love the Development is willing to put in, then I have high hopes for the popularity of this edition.

Any player familiar with more than one past edition of Dungeons & Dragons, D&D Next clearly shows off its genes. Working backwards, it keeps the idea of At Will abilities and some level of class balance across all 20 levels in terms of usefulness and badassness (Yes. It’s a word.) are kept from 4e. WotC also kept the pared down skills list in favor of a small handful of skill groups, like Survival and Athletics, but more are added for more exploration and non-combat situations, like Performance. From 3e, Saving Throws make a real comeback, from the basically flat 50/50 chance that 4e tried to make them out. Many 3e fans complained about the absence of the Spells Per Day as a way to make spell casters actually feel like scholars and masters of their arts, and they make their triumphant return to next. From AD&D, class kits return. Instead of poring through tome after arcane tome for the right feat or piece of equipment, Next (borrowing from AD&D) really revitalizes the concept of the class kit by providing a specific set of skills, gear, and feats for a chosen background.

To hear me discuss this more, check out my podcast with Ben where we talk it out.

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typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

#CaptLog 2014.204 #Viking feast for #DnD night with my Viking skin of #L5R.

i would love to do something like this. 

All it takes is a little preplanning with your gaming group. We set a date and said, “Viking feast. Huzzah!”

Well none of us can cook so it would probably be a burnt food fest. *chuckles*

50% of ours was store bought. No shame.

typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

#CaptLog 2014.204 #Viking feast for #DnD night with my Viking skin of #L5R.

i would love to do something like this. 

All it takes is a little preplanning with your gaming group. We set a date and said, “Viking feast. Huzzah!”

Well none of us can cook so it would probably be a burnt food fest. *chuckles*

50% of ours was store bought. No shame.

44 notes

typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

#CaptLog 2014.204 #Viking feast for #DnD night with my Viking skin of #L5R.

i would love to do something like this. 

All it takes is a little preplanning with your gaming group. We set a date and said, “Viking feast. Huzzah!”

typhoonwizard:

mrnnj:

#CaptLog 2014.204 #Viking feast for #DnD night with my Viking skin of #L5R.

i would love to do something like this. 

All it takes is a little preplanning with your gaming group. We set a date and said, “Viking feast. Huzzah!”

0 notes

Sexual Themes Incoming

WARNING. I MAKE SOME ADULT THEME CONFESSIONS BELOW. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

Bondage never really excited me. Sure, I don’t mind getting my wrists tied now and then, but if she likes the power, I’m digging the rush it gives me to be sub. But the idea of being dom and tying a woman up, it goes on the “What Turns Nicely On Scale” right around “Here’s a nude of a hot woman.” Yes I appreciate the female form (After 10 years if exploring, pretty sure that’s what I like.), but a slow strip tease or hell, even potential of some clothes on, I’m up faster than the speed of light. But I digress from my point on bondage. I was never really hip on bondage until I went to a magic show recently. The VERY lovely magician’s assistant was chained up and locked in a box. Thank the gods and ancestors I was alone in a row in a dark auditorium, because my legs were crossing like they had a mind of their own. Something about her physical appearance plus the outfit she was wearing (A tight yet classy pair of pants, sensible heel height, and a shiny top of a decent cut [Not too revealing, but sewn just right to be accentuating.].), for the first time ever a woman in chains had me hot and bovvered. Yes, I know it’s natural. I just needed to let these emotions out. It’s something my counselor told me to do. And since it would be completely inappropriate to share other thoughts that are filed in the same drawer for professional reasons… Why not share a fantasy?